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Student in Togas at Latin Day 2018

Departments

9th Grade Team

Christopher Affie

Christopher Affie

Mathematics
Lauren Bannon

Lauren Bannon

Mathematics
Patrick Cooke

Patrick Cooke

Science
Debra Lewis

Debra Lewis

Administration
Courtney Mullaney

Courtney Mullaney

Mathematics
Katieann Pirog

Katieann Pirog

Guidance
Dennis Rupar

Dennis Rupar

Social Studies/History
Susan Sojka

Susan Sojka

Administration
Shannon Whitney

Shannon Whitney

English

9th Grade Handbook

Welcome

Welcome, Class of 2022!


Welcome to your Freshman year at The Gilbert School! This is an extremely exciting time to be a Yellowjacket and the next four years will prove to be a challenging and rewarding journey. Our faculty, support staff, and administration will be working diligently to ensure a smooth transition to high school, as well as a comfortable and confident learning environment. In the pages that follow, you will find the basic information to help guide you through what proves to be an enriching first year of high school.


Throughout the year, the 9th Grade Team will meet daily to discuss students needs, interventions, and strategies that will help all of our freshmen succeed at a higher level of education. Our goal is to ensure that our students get off to the best possible start and have a lot of fun!

 

Mission Statement

The Gilbert School is committed to assuring that all of our students are prepared to be thoughtful and productive citizens in a complex, global society.
In pursuing this Mission, we believe that:

All students can learn and be successful.

All students are valued and deserve an education that addresses their academic, physical, and social/emotional needs.
All students are entitled to a safe, healthy and respectful learning environment.

All members of The Gilbert School community must uphold high expectations, be accountable, and demonstrate a commitment to excellence.

Celebrating the heritage of The Gilbert School strengthens community pride and inspires individual accomplishments.

Philosophy of The Gilbert School

The Gilbert School was founded by William L. Gilbert for  the purpose of providing instruction “for the improvement of mankind by affording such assistance and means of educating the young as will help them to become good citizens.” Therefore, our philosophy embodies the following key components:

To be concerned with the development of the entire student: his/her physical, intellectual, emotional, and social growth.
To prepare our students in the life skills necessary to survive, succeed, and contribute to their community.

To motivate students in the quest of knowledge for their entire lives.

To nurture the growth of values such as respect, honesty, tolerance, and strong work ethics.

To present a curriculum that will provide a challenge for students at all levels, giving all students responsibility, accountability, and active participation in their education.

To be knowledgeable of the newest methods and trends in education, including technology, and to implement those programs in the curriculum that are responsive to the changing needs of their community.

Academic Requirements

Academic Credit Graduation Standards
Successful completion of twenty-five (25) Carnegie Credits. These credits must include four (4) in English, three (3) in Mathematics, three (3) in Social Studies, two (2) in Science, one (1) in Arts/Vocational, point five (.05) credits in Wellness/One (1) credit in Physical Education and Health, and eight (8) in electives. (TBD by official board policy adoption in near future)
*In Middle school, students do not need to reach a certain threshold for credits. In high school, ALL courses are credit bearing, attendance counts toward credit (see full student handbook policy), and each year students need to meet a minimum credit requirement in order to be considered as a member of the 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade classes.  If they do not meet these, they will need to make up those credits in order to catch up with their class or to graduate.  

Midterm & Final Exam Weights
There are two major summative exams each semester - a midterm at the end of semester 1, and a final exam at the end of semester 2.  These exams count for 20% of the semester grade. In other words, marking period one has a 40% weight, marking period two has a 40% weight, and the midterm carries a 20% weight towards the calculation of the semester 1 grade. The same goes for quarter 3, 4, and the final exam for semester two’s grade.  

Class Trip
During quarter four, the ninth grade team takes a class trip to celebrate the close of freshmen year. Last year’s trip was to Lake Compounce. Past trips have been held for those students who remain off the D/F list, students that have not received ISS/OSS, and students that have no missing work. Criteria is announced ahead of time, and teachers form small work groups during Flex to aid students that are currently ineligible.

Academic Resources
Students have many opportunities to benefit from academic help.  One of the focuses of Flex is organizing, goal setting, PowerSchool grade review and individual support for students needing to address specific needs such as clarification or make up work with teachers. 

The freshmen team meets daily in order to discuss specific student needs and interventions. As core subject teachers, this collaboration is valuable in order to put into place individual student plans as needed. 

Sports & Clubs

Students are encouraged to get involved within The Gilbert School. There are a variety of sports and clubs offered that students can participate in. 

FALL SPORTS:  Football, Volleyball, Girls Soccer, Boys Soccer, Cross Country

WINTER SPORTS:  Boys Basketball, Girls Basketball, Wrestling, Swimming & Diving

SPRING SPORTS:  Baseball, Golf, Softball, Track and Field, Boys Tennis, Girls Tennis

CLUBS & ACTIVITIES: Band, Choir, Student Ambassador, Drama Club, Student Council, PEERS, GSA, Leo Club, Class Officers, Help plan activities such as Homecoming, fundraising for class trips and prom

Athletic Eligibility

THE GILBERT SCHOOL STUDENT-ATHLETE – ELIGIBILITY POLICY 2018-2019
 

Student-athlete eligibility will be determined using quarterly report cards, with the exception of using final year grades for fall sports. Student-athletes will be subject to either gain or lose eligibility, for the entire quarter, based on the following: 

  • In order to be academically eligible to participate in interscholastic competition a student athlete must maintain a collective 2.0 GPA and not have any F’s on their previous report cards. 
  • Eligibility of student-athletes entering the fall will be based on final grades the previous year.  
  • If a student-athlete happens to lose their eligibility, or is not eligible at the start of the season, they can become or will remain part of the team, practice, attend all team functions (other than road games), however they will not be allowed to participate in interscholastic competition. 
  • While ineligible, students will remain part of their team, as stated above, however, they cannot dress out for games and will not be allowed to travel to away contests. * Coaches may not use academic eligibility as criteria for making cuts during tryouts.  
  • If at progress reports, an ineligible student-athlete meets the eligibility criteria, with a 2.0 GPA and no F’s, the coach, AD and principal can make the decision to reinstate academic eligibility. This is in consideration that the student-athlete has been attending all practices and is in good-standing within The Gilbert School community

PowerSchool, Supply List, Class Dues

Powerschool
It is strongly encouraged that both parents and students regularly check PowerSchool to stay informed of student progress. The Gilbert School policy is that grades are updated weekly. Please contact teachers if there are any questions. 

Supply List
For the 2018-2019 year, freshmen students will be required to have  separate 1” binders for Science, Math and English and a notebook and folder Social Studies. A composition notebook will also be required for English class. Students will be supplied with a school issued planner that should be kept on them at all times. Students are also required to bring a pen and pencil to each class. Any additional materials that may be required will be noted on individual course syllabi.

Class Dues
Each year students pay class dues to help offset the cost of prom, their class trip and other activities over the course of their time at Gilbert. In order to be eligible to  go to prom or on a class trip students need to have paid their class dues each year. Freshmen dues are $5 and can be paid  to Mr. Affie or Ms. Pirog, the class advisors. 

9th Grade Policies

Late Work Policy
College Prep and Academic Level Classes: Scores for late work will be deducted as follows: 10 points will be taken off the score earned per day late. For example, a 95% assignment turned in a day late will be scored as a 85%, two days late a 75%. 

In PowerSchool, this will be marked as a 0/missing. After (max) 5 school days late, the missing annotation will be removed and the zero stands. After this point, students may not make up the assignment for any credit. This policy is to ensure that all students keep up with their assignments and do not fall behind. 

Honors Level Classes and Elective Courses: Please see the individual course syllabus for late work policy as they may vary from the freshmen team policy.

Absent Policy
If a student is absent excused from school, they have the same number of days they were absent to make up the work they missed. For example, if a student is absent 2 days, they have 2 days to make up their work.  This includes assessments such as tests or quizzes. 

Objective and Bell Ringers
These will be part of the daily routine for 9th grade students in all classes. They should both be written down by students and graded; accountability should be maintained. The specific format and grading style is determined by each teacher, but for consistency it is expected that 9th grade teachers grade this several times per marking period, and make objective and bell ringer the standard beginning of each 9th grade class.

3 Item Inspection
Random preparedness inspections will be conducted by 9th grade teachers, at least 2x per marking period. For consistency, every 9th grade student should bring to every class: 1. The notebook (folder, binder) for that specific class. 2. The TGS issued student planner. 3. A writing implement, standard graphite pencil or blue/black pen. Students will receive a classwork grade for each random inspection.

Late to class
All unexcused tardies will result in a teacher detention. There is no 3-tardy leeway; students know they should be punctual. On time means inside the classroom before the bell tone ends, as opposed to students walking in just after.

The Arts

Arts logo

Music - Scott Minnerly, Dept. Liaison and Adam Atkins

Visual Art - Peggy Steinway and Jessica Makowski

Drama - Katie Wood and Francesca Caruso

Theater Tech - Scott Minnerly

 

Awards and Honors

Music Calendar

 

Adam Atkins

Adam Atkins

Music, Chorus
Scott Minnerly

Scott Minnerly

Music, Band
Peggy Steinway

Peggy Steinway

Art

Career & Tech Ed

Donald Crossman

Donald Crossman

7-12 Career Technology Education Teacher, Athletic Director
Steven Hodges

Steven Hodges

7-12 Technology Teacher
Valerie Poirier

Valerie Poirier

Business Teacher
Samantha Seiler

Samantha Seiler

7-12 Business Teacher

Career and Technical Education Department

Preparing Students for the Real World

The Career & Technical Education Department at TGS is committed to providing the skills needed to be competitive in today’s global society. As a result of participation in a variety of courses at The Gilbert School 7-12 CTE Program, students will:

Demonstrate interpersonal, teamwork, and leadership skills needed to function in diverse working environments.

Appreciate the value of the entrepreneurial spirit, both in the small business and in the corporate environment.

Apply the critical-thinking skills needed to function in students’ multiple roles as citizens, consumers, worker, manager, business owners, and director of their own economic futures.

Communicate effectively as writers, listeners, and speakers.

Investigate the use of technology in the real world.

Learn to operate tools and machines with safety and skill, manufacturing and carpentry techniques, etc. that can be applied to the real world in real careers.

Operate software for computers that is used in the engineering fields to design and output real drawings that manufacturers, carpenters, part makers, etc. would use to create a real product.

Understand how businesses operate as a consumer, manager, or business owner.

Select and apply technology tools for making personal and business decisions and achieving personal and organizational goals.

Read, interpret and analyze financial statements, and demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed for making informed business and personal financial decisions.

ELL

Hyewon Noh

Hyewon Noh

World Languages, ELL
David Rutherford

David Rutherford

ELL

ESL Program

The ultimate goal for the student who is an English Language Learner (ELL) is autonomy in the target language (English). ESL support is meant to promote and enhance academic excellence for English Language Learners.

In an increasingly culturally diverse world, The Gilbert School recognizes the need for all educational stakeholders to offer a variety of learning experiences and opportunity designed to ensure successful learning for all students.

In particular, ESL Students' needs are addressed according to CT State Department of Education Guidelines for English Language Learners.

Students at Levels One, Two or Three are offered mandatory support.

Students at Levels 4 and 5 may experience total immersion into mainstream classes, with optional support and monitoring of their progress.

The process of serving ELLs is on a continuum that begins when the student arrives and ends when they have exited the ELL program by mastering the CAPT tests in Reading and Math and achieving an overall score of Level 4 or 5 in English Language Proficiency as measured by the LAS Links.

Phase One:

Identification of ELLs through a Home Language Survey

English Language Proficiency Oral Assessment (standardized interview)

Placement Test (LAS Links) in Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking

Following consultation with student, ESL teacher, counselors and mainstream teachers, students are offered classes according to their ability to function in their native country and their overall ability to master academic subjects.

During their first month or so of school students receive:

Newcomer Welcome and Orientation

Targeted, Culturally Sensitive ESL Instruction and support

May include use of native language learning materials/translation

Observation of student in various settings

Phase Two:

Building knowledge through academic and social language development

Alignment with CCSS (Common Core State Standards)

Annual Assessment of English Language Proficiency using LAS Links (assessment tool)

Integration of Technology in all subject areas

Formative and summative classroom assessments (ongoing informal assessments)

Sheltered Instruction as needed

Additional Support

Phase Three:

Students will be encouraged to participate independently in a global society by using higher level thinking skills, and to compete with native English speakers in mainstream classes and extracurricular activities. These ESL students have the advantage of dual language competency, which will serve them well going forward in all their future endeavors.

In our Vision statement: “The Gilbert School, in partnership with parents and community, will strive to prepare every student for a lifetime of learning by producing an educational experience that fosters intellectual, social, emotional and personal growth in a safe and nurturing environment.”

English

Francesca Daniele

Francesca Daniele

English Teacher
Jeffery Even

Jeffery Even

English Teacher
Jennifer Gilley

Jennifer Gilley

High School English Teacher
Tina Keegan

Tina Keegan

Middle School Language Arts Teacher
Catherine Lanyon

Catherine Lanyon

Language Arts Teacher
Brad Toomey

Brad Toomey

High School English Teacher
Shannon Whitney

Shannon Whitney

English Teacher
Katherine Wood

Katherine Wood

High School English Teacher

English

Middle School English program:

Our middle-school program consists of a 7th grade literature and writing rich curriculum which revolves around our 7th grade literature course and an accompanying Language Arts course. This provides students with a double-block of literacy every day to reinforce the skills necessary to master reading and writing at the middle school level and beyond. Our 8th grade curriculum builds upon this foundation with an intense focus on the implementation of common core standards in order to aid students to become better readers, writers, and thinkers to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

High School English program:

The English Curriculum is a four-year sequential program required of all students for graduation. English competency grows as students read extensively, listen analytically to others, speak with clarity, and organize their own thoughts through the writing process. Each year is designed to promote growth in the various forms of written and oral expression, as well as shape an appreciation of different genres of literature through careful reading and critical analysis. The studies of vocabulary, grammar, as well as literature are incorporated into the curriculum.

Our program aligns with the common core and extensively prepares students for career readiness, college readiness and above all reinforces 21st century skills needed in the workplace and for college/university study.

The high school curriculum begins with Freshmen World Literature which builds upon the foundations of literary analysis, literary terminology, formal essay writing, and personal reflection. The Sophomore Early American Literature

(American Studies I) and Junior Modern American Literature (American Studies II) courses follow a thematic approach designed to help students appreciate historical context within literary works all while fine-tuning writing and reading skills and mastering all facets of writing. These two courses are linked with their History department counterparts in order to provide historical, social, and cultural connections within the chosen American Studies themes. The Senior World Literature course is an examination of the development of the literature starting with ancient Babylonian texts transcending through the Renaissance and culminating with a critical analysis of modern pieces. Students have the opportunity to experience Advanced placement offerings in both AP English Language and Composition and AP Literature and Composition as well as a developing elective base including drama offerings, interdisciplinary coursework, genre- specific writing courses , and other courses expected to be forthcoming.

Math

Christopher Affie

Christopher Affie

7-12 Math Teacher, Freshman Class Advisor
Lauren Bannon

Lauren Bannon

High School Math Teacher
James Brady

James Brady

Math Teacher
Karri Moran

Karri Moran

Middle School Math Teacher, Middle School Mathematics Club Advisor
Courtney Mullaney

Courtney Mullaney

High School Math Teacher
Sarah Schackner

Sarah Schackner

Middle School Math Teacher
Rodney Skottegaard

Rodney Skottegaard

Math Intervention Teacher

Math

The Mathematics Department offers a wide range of course offerings to meet the needs of students at different levels of math ability. Courses range from 7th grade Mathematics and Pre-Algebra to Advanced Placement Calculus and Statistics.

Courses are structured to prepare students to be critical thinkers in an increasingly competitive society. Courses are also structured to prepare students for assessments such as state tests, the SAT, and AP testing.

Students have opportunities to meet before school, after school, during X block or free periods with teachers and/or tutors to receive extra assistance.

Please see our course offerings with descriptions in the program of studies or email Chris Affie at affiec@gilbertschool.org for more information about the Mathematics Department.

Science

Melissa Bryant

Melissa Bryant

High School Science Teacher
Science
Patrick Cooke

Patrick Cooke

High School Science Teacher
Science
David Gewanter

David Gewanter

Physics Teacher
Science
Brian Ingmanson

Brian Ingmanson

Middle School Science Teacher
Science
Craig Levesque

Craig Levesque

Middle School Science Teacher
Science
Sophia Vinnikova

Sophia Vinnikova

Chemistry Teacher
Science

Science

A shift in alignment of our science curriculum has begun and the transition will continue over the next couple of years. The current assessment for 10th grade is gone and will not happen next year, and the next generation assessment will move up to the junior year. It will have a soft rollout in 2019 and become the standard assessment in 2020. The CMT will still be taken by the 8th grade next year and will transition to alignment with the NGSS during the 2018-2019 year.

WHAT ARE THE NEW SCIENCE STANDARDS?

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are a new set of K–12 science standards that were developed by states, for states. The NGSS identify scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas in science that all K–12 students should master in order to prepare for success in college and 21st-century careers.

WHY ARE THEY IMPORTANT?

It has been more than 17 years since the National Research Council and the American Association for the Advancement of Science produced their reports from which most state science standards are based. Since then, there have been major advances in science and our understanding of how students learn science. Students need the kind of preparation that gives them the tools and skills necessary to succeed in a rapidly and continuously changing world.

When current students graduate from high school, more jobs will require skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) than in the past. The NGSS provide a strong science education that equips students

with the ability to think critically, analyze information, and solve complex problems — the skills needed to pursue opportunities within and beyond STEM fields.

WHAT WILL THE NGSS LOOK LIKE IN THE CLASSROOM?

High-quality education standards allow educators to teach effectively, moving their practice toward how students learn best—in a hands-on, collaborative, and integrated environment rooted in inquiry and discovery. Teaching based on the NGSS calls for more student-centered learning that enables students to think on their own, problem solve, communicate, and collaborate—in addition to learning important scientific concepts.

Social Studies/History

Charles Harbach

Charles Harbach

Titles: Middle School Social Studies Teacher, Assistant Athletic Director
Roles: Faculty & Staff, Coach
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:
Timothy Hoffman

Timothy Hoffman

Titles: Social Studies Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:
Jessica Nardine

Jessica Nardine

Titles: Social Studies Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:
Kathryn Rohlfing

Kathryn Rohlfing

Titles: Social Studies Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:
Dennis Rupar

Dennis Rupar

Titles: High School Social Studies Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:
Wendy Sultaire

Wendy Sultaire

Titles: High School Social Studies Teacher
Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Social Studies/History
Email:

Social Studies

The Gilbert School Middle/High School Department has developed a 7-12 program that is constituted as an interdisciplinary curriculum, drawing on all of the social sciences. Its goal is to help students become effective citizens in an ever changing world. We seek to establish understandings of U.S. history, government institutions and world cultures. The focus is on enhancing personal citizenship, and widening the student’s appreciation of common problems facing humanity.

In addition to mastering content, the social studies curriculum stresses skills and attitudes. Through the use of technology students will continue to gain skills in critical thinking, problem solving, research, and oral/written communication.


Special Services

Constituent

Sabrina Aldrige

Sabrina Aldrige

Winchester Special Education
Kimberly Baker

Kimberly Baker

Winchester Special Education
Katie Mello

Katie Mello

Winchester Special Education
Terri Rode

Terri Rode

Winchester Special Education
Tamra Weeks

Tamra Weeks

Winchester Special Education

Wellness

Cynthia Fixer

Cynthia Fixer

Wellness: PE/Health
Gene Michaud

Gene Michaud

Wellness: PE/Health
Joshua Penn

Joshua Penn

Wellness: PE/Health

The Physical Education program is designed to help students learn skills and develop positive attitudes necessary for them to lead healthy, active and productive lives. The State of Connecticut requires that each student earn one credit in this subject in order to graduate from high school. Objectives are based on National and State Standards.

Health

The Health and Safety Education program is designed to help students develop and maintain behaviors that promote lifelong wellness. Objectives of the program are based on state standards. This is a planned, ongoing, and systematic curriculum that includes state mandated lessons in HIV prevention, suicide prevention and substance abuse resistance education as well as other current health issues of adolescents. Instructors are certified American Red Cross teachers and juniors and seniors have opportunities to earn certification in adult CPR.

National Standards for K-12 Physical Education

World Languages

Cheryl Caneschi

Cheryl Caneschi

Middle School Spanish Teacher
Sarah Frechette

Sarah Frechette

7-12 Latin Teacher
Kevin McKeown

Kevin McKeown

Spanish Teacher
Hyewon Noh

Hyewon Noh

ELL Teacher

World Languages

The World Languages Department teaches the four basic skills inherent in the acquisition of a language- listening, speaking, reading, and writing. We address each of the “5 C’s” of the National Standards appropriately to the language and level: Communication, Culture, Comparisons, Connections, and Communitites. Each language offered in the department provides AP or U Conn credit in level 4 or 5.

The Department also is the home of a sequence of courses in Classical Studies, in which students read works of Greek and Latin literature in English translation; these courses are not offered for foreign language credit.

Philosophy of the World Languages Department

The study of World Languages consists of a body of knowledge that includes the vocabulary, grammatical structures, and syntax of the target language; the acquisition of receptive and expressive skills to communicate actively and passively in the target language; and elements of the culture of the target language, including history, geography, customs, arts, foods, etc.

Our philosophy of Foreign Language education is based on the statement in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning produced by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). ACTFL states that “Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience. The United States must educate students who are equipped linguistically and culturally to communicate successfully in a pluralistic American society and abroad.” (page 7). We believe that acquiring proficiency in a modern or classical language will enable students to benefit in many ways: students will gain the ability to communicate with other people in other cultures, acquire insight into other cultures, and develop the means to gain access to bodies of knowledge on their own terms and to gain greater awareness of themselves and communities. We believe that all students can succeed in learning Foreign Languages, whether modern or classical. Foreign Language education is part of the core curriculum: it is integral to the entire school experience, provides unique benefits in intellectual development and integrates students into the wider world community.

Communication in languages other than English has become increasingly important in a diverse nation and in an ever-shrinking world. Through long, uninterrupted sequences of second languages, learners acquire the skills and cultural understandings that permit them to function in a non-English speaking environment. Technological advances have provided new opportunities for learners to use their second language skills in interactions with other speakers and to learn about other cultures whether or not they travel beyond their classrooms. The study of Latin and Ancient Greek offers students the same benefits as the study of other languages except that the emphasis on oral communication is not as great.

Program Goals of the World Languages Department

In general the goals of the Department reflect the National Standards. In studying foreign languages, students will learn to:

communicate in languages other than English

gain knowledge and understanding of other cultures

connect with other disciplines and acquire information

develop insight into the nature of languages and culture

participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world

The application of the Standards differs in the context of modern languages and classical languages. In the context of modern language instruction, students will learn to communicate in all four language skills—listening, speaking, reading and writing. Classical language instruction is primarily concerned with the ability to read Latin and Ancient Greek: the other skills areas help with the acquisition of that skill. Spanish students learn about the contemporary cultures of the Hispanic world and participate in them; classical language students learn about the ancient world and participate in the community (-ies) of Ancient Greek and Latin as the heirs of classical culture. All foreign language students gain insight into their own culture by coming in contact with those of people different from them in time or in geographical location.

Specific goals of the program include:

To develop in the student the ability to understand, speak, read and write the target language as appropriate according to The Connecticut World Languages Curriculum Framework.

To acquaint the student with the culture and civilization, i.e. art, music, history, literature, etc. of the target language.

To develop an awareness and appreciation for one’s own language and culture by means of contrast and comparison.

To promote an understanding of a diverse society through the acquisition of knowledge concerning a second language and the people who speak it, as well as the common linguistic heritage of Western Culture.

To promote an interest in the acquisition of a second language and its usefulness in enhancing career opportunities.